It’s been several days since McCain made what should have been one of the biggest speeches of his career, and I’m still not sure what to say.

When you’ve got someone lying and bloviating in his speechifying like that, where do you start?

Well, that, and I had a hard time staying awake for the entire speech. I felt like a little kid trying to behave in church or something – I knew I should be paying attention, but it was soooo boring, and the couch was so comfy, and my eyes were kind of tired anyway and…well, you get the idea.

I agree with SilentPatriot’s assessment over at Crooks and Liars:

Not only was the speech poorly delivered and mind-numbingly boring, it was without substance. Obama’s speech was a generational call to arms to disaffected Americans who are sick and tired of the paralyzing partisanship and unacceptable status quo. Mccain’s was boilerplate

There was one thing I found a bit disturbing, though.

Well, no, actually, there were a bunch of things I found a bit disturbing. But this is an aspect I haven’t seen commented on in the blogs or news sites I read, so I thought I ought to mention it.

About eight minutes into the speech, McCain speaks directly to Barack Obama:

And finally, a word to Senator Obama and his supporters. We’ll go at it, we’ll go at it over the next two months, you know that’s the nature of this business. And there are big differences between us. But you have my respect, and my admiration. Despite our differences, much more unites us than divides us. We are fellow Americans, and that’s an association that means more to me than any other. We’re dedicated to the proposition that all people are created equal, and endowed by our creator with inalienable rights. No country, no country ever had a greater cause than that. And I wouldn’t be an American worthy of the name, if I didn’t honor Senator Obama and his supporters for their achievement.

All well and good. He doesn’t congratulate Obama outright on being the first African American to win a major political party’s nomination for president, but the allusion to both the Declaration of Independence (“all men are created equal, and endowed by our creator with unalienable rights”) and Lincoln’s Gettysburg address (“dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal”) make it clear enough that this is what he is speaking of. And of course, honoring Obama on his historic achievement is an appropriate, honorable, and classy thing to do.
But then he looks at the audience of Republican convention delegates and party bigwigs — the overwhelmingly, disproportionately, almost unbelievably white audience — and says:

But let there be no doubt my friends, we’re going to win this election. We’re going to win.

Emphasis as in the original.

Yes, he really emphasized the “we’re” both times. Immediately after the sentence about honoring Obama and his supporters for their achievement.

And all I can think, is that he means, “We, the rich white people, are going to win.”

Maybe I’m reading too much into things. I’ve been known to do that on occasion. It may be that McCain didn’t mean “we rich white people,” but instead merely meant “we Republicans (most of whom happen to be white).” Maybe he even just meant, “we Republicans.”

I’ve watched this portion of the speech several times over the past few days, trying to figure out if I was just imagining it, or if he really had emphasized the words in a way that would suggest that he meant my first interpretation of his words.

And I still kinda think he meant it that way.

So I guess I need a reality check. I’m including a YouTube video of the speech below. Use the slider bar to fast-forward to about 8:22 into the speech, watch it for yourself, and tell me what you think:

Am I reading too much into it?

jane doe

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